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Chandrayaan-2 to be launched on July 15: ISRO

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Chandrayaan-2, India’s second mission on the moon, would be launched on July 15, according to the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Chairman K. Sivan. As the Indian space agency is all set to embark on its most complex mission, an uncharted territory so far, the landing on the moon near the South Pole would be on September 6 or 7.

The launch would take place at 2.51 am on board the GSLV MK-III vehicle from the spaceport of Sriharikota. Earlier, the ISRO had kept the launch window for the mission from July 9 to July 16.

The spacecraft, with a mass of 3.8 tonne, has three modules, Orbiter, Lander (Vikram) and Rover (Pragyan).

“Orbiter would have eight payloads, Lander three and Rover two,” said Sivan.

According to the ISRO, Orbiter, with scientific payloads, would orbit around the moon. Lander would soft land on the moon at a predetermined site and deploy Rover.

The scientific payloads on board Orbiter, Lander and Rover are expected to perform mineralogical and elemental studies of the lunar surface. The Orbiter and Lander modules would be interfaced mechanically and stacked together as an integrated module and accommodated inside the GSLV MK-III launch vehicle. Rover is housed inside Lander.

After the launch into an earth-bound orbit by GSLV MK-III, the integrated module would reach the moon orbit using the orbiter propulsion module and subsequently, Lander would separate from Orbiter and soft land at the predetermined site, close to lunar South Pole, the ISRO said.

Rover would roll out for carrying out scientific experiments on the lunar surface, it said, noting that instruments were also mounted on Lander and Orbiter for carrying out scientific experiments.

Chandrayaan-2 to face tough challenges: ISRO

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The latest build-up, much awaited Chandrayaan-2 is to be launched between 9th July to 16th July this year. According to the officials of Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), Chandrayaan-2 has to overcome tough challenges while executing a soft landing of its rover Vikram, on the moon’s south pole.

According to the ISRO officials, the first challenge relates to maintaining the accuracy of the trajectory of the spacecraft, meaning Chandrayaan-2 must follow the designated path to the moon since the distance is 3,844 lakh kms.

The second challenge related to the deep space communication since radio signals are weak with heavy background noise which needs to be picked up by the large antennas.

The third challenge is the trans lunar injection and lunar capture, which means getting into the moon’s sphere of influence, which will be a critical manoeuvre as it has to be an extremely precise and accurate calculation.

Chandrayaan -2 to have 13 payloads: ISR0

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Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) stated that India’s second moon mission Chandrayaan-2, which is planned for July launch will have 13 payloads and one passive experiment from American space agency NASA.

“Thirteen Indian payloads (8 on orbiter, 3 on lander and 2 on rover) and one passive experiment from NASA,” ISRO said in a mission update, but did not specify them or their objective.

The Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft has been designed with a mass of 3.8 tonnes and consists of three modules – Orbiter, Lander (Vikram) and Rover (Pragyan).

All the modules are getting ready for Chandrayaan-2 launch during the window of July 9 to July 16, 2019, with an expected Moon landing on September 6, the space agency had said earlier this month.

The orbiter will orbit 100 km from the lunar surface, while lander (Vikram) will do the soft landing near the south pole of moon, and Rover (Pragyan) will conduct in-situ experiments.

The orbiter and lander modules will be interfaced mechanically and stacked together as an integrated module and accommodated inside the GSLV MK-III launch vehicle, ISRO has said, adding the rover is housed inside the lander.

After launch into earth-bound orbit by GSLV MK-III, the integrated module will reach Moon orbit using orbiter propulsion module, and subsequently, lander will separate from the orbiter and soft land at the predetermined site close to lunar South Pole.

Further, the rover will roll out for carrying out scientific experiments on the lunar surface, ISRO has said, noting that instruments are also mounted on lander and orbiter for carrying out scientific experiments.

ISRO Chairman K Sivan had said in January, “We are going to land at a place where nobody else has gone-the Moon’s South Pole… it is unexplored region.”

Chandrayaan-2 mission, is an advanced version of the previous Chandrayaan-1 mission about 10 years ago.

Chandrayaan-1 had 11 payloads- five from India, three from Europe, 2 from USA and 1 from Bulgaria, and the mission had the credit for discovery of water on the lunar surface.

The 1.4 tonne spacecraft was launched using PSLV and the orbiter had orbited 100 km from the lunar surface.

Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) stated that India’s second moon mission Chandrayaan-2, which is planned for July launch will have 13 payloads and one passive experiment from American space agency NASA.

“Thirteen Indian payloads (8 on orbiter, 3 on lander and 2 on rover) and one passive experiment from NASA,” ISRO said in a mission update, but did not specify them or their objective.

The Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft has been designed with a mass of 3.8 tonnes and consists of three modules – Orbiter, Lander (Vikram) and Rover (Pragyan).

All the modules are getting ready for Chandrayaan-2 launch during the window of July 9 to July 16, 2019, with an expected Moon landing on September 6, the space agency had said earlier this month.

The orbiter will orbit 100 km from the lunar surface, while lander (Vikram) will do the soft landing near the south pole of moon, and Rover (Pragyan) will conduct in-situ experiments.

The orbiter and lander modules will be interfaced mechanically and stacked together as an integrated module and accommodated inside the GSLV MK-III launch vehicle, ISRO has said, adding the rover is housed inside the lander.

After launch into earth-bound orbit by GSLV MK-III, the integrated module will reach Moon orbit using orbiter propulsion module, and subsequently, lander will separate from the orbiter and soft land at the predetermined site close to lunar South Pole.

Further, the rover will roll out for carrying out scientific experiments on the lunar surface, ISRO has said, noting that instruments are also mounted on lander and orbiter for carrying out scientific experiments.

ISRO Chairman K Sivan had said in January, “We are going to land at a place where nobody else has gone-the Moon’s South Pole… it is unexplored region.”

Chandrayaan-2 mission, is an advanced version of the previous Chandrayaan-1 mission about 10 years ago.

Chandrayaan-1 had 11 payloads- five from India, three from Europe, 2 from USA and 1 from Bulgaria, and the mission had the credit for discovery of water on the lunar surface.

The 1.4 tonne spacecraft was launched using PSLV and the orbiter had orbited 100 km from the lunar surface.

ISRO to launch Radar Imaging Satellite by May end 2019

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Latest radar imaging satellite (RISAT), the RISAT-2BR1 is all set to be launched by ISRO (Indian Space Research Organisation) by the May end.

According to the IANS report, the launch will take place on May 22. India is likely to use one of ISRO’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) reusable rockets, which have offered significant progress and sophistication of technology in terms of advancement in space technologies.

The RISAT, which was first deployed in orbit on April 20, 2009 as the RISAT-2, uses synthetic aperture radars (SAR) to provide Indian forces with all-weather surveillance and observation, which are crucial to notice any potential threat or malicious activity around the nation’s borders.

While RISAT-1 was expected to be released first, the incident of the 2008 terror attacks in Mumbai meant that the deployment of the satellite needed to be hastened. With the C-band SAR, being built by Inda, not being ready in time, India deployed the RISAT-2, which was based on the X-band SAR — technology built by the Israel Aerospace Industries.

The to-be-deployed RISAT-2BR1 satellite uses the same SAR band, and will further improve India’s imaging reconnaissance abilities. ISRO will be executing the launch with the PSLV-C46, which will take off from the Sriharikota launch pad on May 22, given weather conditions remain permissible. ISRO also has multiple other launches in the pipeline such as the Cartosat-3 catography satellite, among other, small defence satellites, which would be subsequently placed in orbit using the smarller shuttle, SSLV.

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