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Chandrayaan-2 has no contact with Vikram Lander till now; Gaganyaan is the next priority: K Sivan

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Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Chairman K. Sivan said the space agency had not been able to establish contact with the Vikram lander as the 14-day deadline for its mission ended on Saturday. The ISRO chief, however, assured that the premier space agency would dig deep to understand what exactly went wrong with the Vikram lander before it lost contact with ISRO. The ISRO Chairman said the agency’s next mission would be Gaganyaan, its most ambitious manned mission, which is scheduled to be launched in 2022.

While Chandrayaan-2 was meant for soft-landing of Vikram on the lunar surface, Gaganyaan’s mandate will be to send the astronauts to space and bring them back to earth safely. “Chandrayaan 2 orbiter is doing very well. There are eight instruments in the orbiter and each instrument is doing exactly what it meant to do. But we have not been able to establish communication with the lander yet,” the ISRO Chairman K Sivan told. He added the agency would try to understand what happened to the lander. “That is our first priority,” Sivan said.

“Chandrayaan 2 orbiter is doing very well. There are eight instruments in the orbiter and each instrument is doing exactly what it meant to do. But we have not been able to establish communication with the lander yet,” said Dr Sivan.

ISRO Chief K Sivan: Chandrayaan-2 orbiter is doing very well. There are 8 instruments in the orbiter & each instrument is doing exactly what it meant to do.Regarding the lander, we have not been able to establish communication with it. Our next priority is Gaganyaan mission.

The world’s top space agency NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) also tried to help the ISRO by taking pictures of the touchdown site — through its Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), to locate the Vikram lander’s position on the Moon but to no avail. NASA said the LRO camera instrument’s had sent the pictures of the intended Moon touchdown site for Vikram but shadows in the area could not capture its exact position.

“It was near dusk as the region prepares to transition from a two-week lunar day to an equally long lunar night, so shadows covered much of the region, and Vikram may not be in the LROC’s field of view,” Aviation Week quoted NASA as saying. NASA is expected to share images of the touchdown area, before and after lunar night, to support analysis by ISRO. NASA added that during LRO’s flyover on September 17, the entire touchdown area was near dusk. It posed a challenge in capturing images due to poor lighting.

India had launched its second Moon Mission in August, but just before the soft landing on September 7, the Vikram lander lost contact with ISRO. The space agency later said the Chandrayaan 2’s Orbiter had sent thermal images of the Vikram lander but could not establish contact with the lander.

Meanwhile, after Chandrayaan 2, the ISRO plans to send three Indians to space by 2022, an announcement made by Prime Minister Narendra Modi during his last Independence Day speech. ISRO will also launch Aditya L-1, India’s first solar mission, by next year. There are also plans to build a space station and launch interplanetary missions to Mars and Venus.

Chandrayaan-2 to be launched on July 15: ISRO

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Chandrayaan-2, India’s second mission on the moon, would be launched on July 15, according to the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Chairman K. Sivan. As the Indian space agency is all set to embark on its most complex mission, an uncharted territory so far, the landing on the moon near the South Pole would be on September 6 or 7.

The launch would take place at 2.51 am on board the GSLV MK-III vehicle from the spaceport of Sriharikota. Earlier, the ISRO had kept the launch window for the mission from July 9 to July 16.

The spacecraft, with a mass of 3.8 tonne, has three modules, Orbiter, Lander (Vikram) and Rover (Pragyan).

“Orbiter would have eight payloads, Lander three and Rover two,” said Sivan.

According to the ISRO, Orbiter, with scientific payloads, would orbit around the moon. Lander would soft land on the moon at a predetermined site and deploy Rover.

The scientific payloads on board Orbiter, Lander and Rover are expected to perform mineralogical and elemental studies of the lunar surface. The Orbiter and Lander modules would be interfaced mechanically and stacked together as an integrated module and accommodated inside the GSLV MK-III launch vehicle. Rover is housed inside Lander.

After the launch into an earth-bound orbit by GSLV MK-III, the integrated module would reach the moon orbit using the orbiter propulsion module and subsequently, Lander would separate from Orbiter and soft land at the predetermined site, close to lunar South Pole, the ISRO said.

Rover would roll out for carrying out scientific experiments on the lunar surface, it said, noting that instruments were also mounted on Lander and Orbiter for carrying out scientific experiments.

Chandrayaan-2 to face tough challenges: ISRO

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The latest build-up, much awaited Chandrayaan-2 is to be launched between 9th July to 16th July this year. According to the officials of Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), Chandrayaan-2 has to overcome tough challenges while executing a soft landing of its rover Vikram, on the moon’s south pole.

According to the ISRO officials, the first challenge relates to maintaining the accuracy of the trajectory of the spacecraft, meaning Chandrayaan-2 must follow the designated path to the moon since the distance is 3,844 lakh kms.

The second challenge related to the deep space communication since radio signals are weak with heavy background noise which needs to be picked up by the large antennas.

The third challenge is the trans lunar injection and lunar capture, which means getting into the moon’s sphere of influence, which will be a critical manoeuvre as it has to be an extremely precise and accurate calculation.

Chandrayaan -2 to have 13 payloads: ISR0

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Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) stated that India’s second moon mission Chandrayaan-2, which is planned for July launch will have 13 payloads and one passive experiment from American space agency NASA.

“Thirteen Indian payloads (8 on orbiter, 3 on lander and 2 on rover) and one passive experiment from NASA,” ISRO said in a mission update, but did not specify them or their objective.

The Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft has been designed with a mass of 3.8 tonnes and consists of three modules – Orbiter, Lander (Vikram) and Rover (Pragyan).

All the modules are getting ready for Chandrayaan-2 launch during the window of July 9 to July 16, 2019, with an expected Moon landing on September 6, the space agency had said earlier this month.

The orbiter will orbit 100 km from the lunar surface, while lander (Vikram) will do the soft landing near the south pole of moon, and Rover (Pragyan) will conduct in-situ experiments.

The orbiter and lander modules will be interfaced mechanically and stacked together as an integrated module and accommodated inside the GSLV MK-III launch vehicle, ISRO has said, adding the rover is housed inside the lander.

After launch into earth-bound orbit by GSLV MK-III, the integrated module will reach Moon orbit using orbiter propulsion module, and subsequently, lander will separate from the orbiter and soft land at the predetermined site close to lunar South Pole.

Further, the rover will roll out for carrying out scientific experiments on the lunar surface, ISRO has said, noting that instruments are also mounted on lander and orbiter for carrying out scientific experiments.

ISRO Chairman K Sivan had said in January, “We are going to land at a place where nobody else has gone-the Moon’s South Pole… it is unexplored region.”

Chandrayaan-2 mission, is an advanced version of the previous Chandrayaan-1 mission about 10 years ago.

Chandrayaan-1 had 11 payloads- five from India, three from Europe, 2 from USA and 1 from Bulgaria, and the mission had the credit for discovery of water on the lunar surface.

The 1.4 tonne spacecraft was launched using PSLV and the orbiter had orbited 100 km from the lunar surface.

Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) stated that India’s second moon mission Chandrayaan-2, which is planned for July launch will have 13 payloads and one passive experiment from American space agency NASA.

“Thirteen Indian payloads (8 on orbiter, 3 on lander and 2 on rover) and one passive experiment from NASA,” ISRO said in a mission update, but did not specify them or their objective.

The Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft has been designed with a mass of 3.8 tonnes and consists of three modules – Orbiter, Lander (Vikram) and Rover (Pragyan).

All the modules are getting ready for Chandrayaan-2 launch during the window of July 9 to July 16, 2019, with an expected Moon landing on September 6, the space agency had said earlier this month.

The orbiter will orbit 100 km from the lunar surface, while lander (Vikram) will do the soft landing near the south pole of moon, and Rover (Pragyan) will conduct in-situ experiments.

The orbiter and lander modules will be interfaced mechanically and stacked together as an integrated module and accommodated inside the GSLV MK-III launch vehicle, ISRO has said, adding the rover is housed inside the lander.

After launch into earth-bound orbit by GSLV MK-III, the integrated module will reach Moon orbit using orbiter propulsion module, and subsequently, lander will separate from the orbiter and soft land at the predetermined site close to lunar South Pole.

Further, the rover will roll out for carrying out scientific experiments on the lunar surface, ISRO has said, noting that instruments are also mounted on lander and orbiter for carrying out scientific experiments.

ISRO Chairman K Sivan had said in January, “We are going to land at a place where nobody else has gone-the Moon’s South Pole… it is unexplored region.”

Chandrayaan-2 mission, is an advanced version of the previous Chandrayaan-1 mission about 10 years ago.

Chandrayaan-1 had 11 payloads- five from India, three from Europe, 2 from USA and 1 from Bulgaria, and the mission had the credit for discovery of water on the lunar surface.

The 1.4 tonne spacecraft was launched using PSLV and the orbiter had orbited 100 km from the lunar surface.

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